Welcome to my blog wich opens up my studio. Check out my projects, inspiration and sketchbook. I hope you enjoy... Sarah

Hard Hat Research..

As part of my research for the cornish project currently in progress, I put on a hard hat at the most amazing resource that I could have wished for: GEEVOR TIN MUSEUM

The perfect destination to inspire designs based on the mines and Cornish Tin Industry.

I visited on the MOST beautiful day and the setting of the coastal setting of the old mine was breathtaking.

Here are some snaps of the machinery and things that caught my eye…

Fabulous steel and wooden architecture – still standing proud despite the mines closure in the 1990's Thatcher's Britain.

Amazing shapes within so many of the  industrial components that are part of the mine's heritage.

Sample Storage: Following preparation and assaying the remaining samples were stored on these shelves.

At the height of the operating mine there would have been approx 10,000 samples.

Absolutely love this huge cog with it's rusting paint and well worn history, a great item for design inspiration…

Here's some sketch book work using images and ideas gleaned from the visit..

The Dry was the area where the miners would change, shower and have a cupper after the gruelling shifts underground.

The clocking in and out tabs that now have an eerie emptyness once the mines were closed after much local protest The museum is in effect the whole mine open for discovery, from everyday items like this box of explosive to the changing rooms and engineering sheds, the amount of information and really interesting history is incredible….

The next part was to don my hard hat and go down into the mine itself!

The majority of the mining was operated below the sea level, for my little visit we remained on land and entered through a tiny doorway that brought home how rudimental the equipment was and what basic facilities the men and boys used…

Once inside it was very tight, dark, cold and eerie, of course when the mines were open there would have beed a tremendous amount of noise to add to the mix.

Basic tools for a highly skilled job!

Above all and beyond the fascinationg insight into the lives of the miners and their families, I found the museum gave a real taste of the enormity of the community that lived, worked, breathed and died from the mining industry. I was moved by much of the personal accounts displayed for visitors and the film outlining the struggle that failed to keep the mine open…

If you'd like to visit or find out more click on this link to the excellent website GEEVOR MINING MUSEUM

 

 

 

 

 

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